Book Review: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Part 1 & 2-J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, John Tiffany.

harry-potter

After nearly a decade, Harry Potter  returns. This time as an adult, married to Ginny Weasley with three children of his own. The story was quite different as it is in play form, one that was opened in London July 30, 2016. J.K. Rowling presents a script form version of the story. Those who grew up with the Harry Potter series are able to revisit characters and be introduced to a new world, where the plot is intertwined with new and old. The story has something for everyone to enjoy, and with world wide popularity of the story it received much praise and criticism.

Harry, Ron, and Hermoine return to the wizarding world as adults, married, and with children. Harry is married to Ginny with two sons, James Sirius and Albus Severus, and a daughter named Lily Luna. Ron and Hermoine are married to each other with one daughter named Rose. Clouds loom overhead as a certain “darkness” tempts its’ return. There to witness this new found darkness is Harry’s son, Albus. Readers see Albus and Harry’s relationship pulse with tenseness as Albus deals with the weight of a famous father, and  not being a Gryffindor. Harry’s struggles with being  a father to a teenager is ultimately the catalyst that drills the events in the story. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” is Albus’ venture into a different wizarding world, yet finds himself going back in time reliving the same world as his father. Beloved characters are reintroduced and new characters take the play into a direction that is somewhat predictable yet fresh, and fun to read. The play is much more introspective as the character development outweighs the action. Harry, Ron, Hermoine still are participatory in the plot, as they help contain and defeat the harrowing darkness. If approached right, readers can have an enjoyable experience with this newest addition to the series.

As expected, there were many who disliked “Harry Potter and Cursed Child” simply because it was play or because it read like fan fiction. Both are true, however I applaud Rowling for exploring a creative avenue that keeps her story of the “Boy Who Lived” alive. Her story will forever be in rotation on many platforms (novel, audio, merchandise, amusement parks, plays, film, etc.) and you have to respect her for keeping her brand prevalent.  Yes, this play read like fan fiction and I was hoping for a bit more. I went into it with low expectations, and it made my reading experience better because I wasn’t as crushed. The “adventure” part of the play is not as heavy as is the character development, especially between Harry and Albus. I actually really liked how real their relationship was. It showed the flawed  gritty bits of fatherhood to a teenager. The play isn’t very vast, and it isn’t going to give you everything you originally found in the novels. Instead, it gathered the main crowd pleasing parts of the series, and created a play. At times, the plot/play seem too contrived and generic and definitely read as fan fiction. It wasn’t the best work-but it did what it meant to do- entertain. Fans of the Harry Potter series were disappointed, and as a fellow Potter fan myself, I was little unsatisfied. If you approach it for what it is, and know that it WILL be different from the novels you’ve read, you’ll probably end up liking it more than if you read it with expectations for it to be like the previous novels. It’s worth a try, especially if you enjoy the characters and want a little nostalgia.

Have you any of read the play? Thoughts?

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